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Monday, November 23, 2020 | History

5 edition of Vitamin C Fortification of Food Aid Commodities found in the catalog.

Vitamin C Fortification of Food Aid Commodities

Final Report

by Committee on International Nutrition--Vitamin C in Food Aid Commodities

  • 139 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by National Academies Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Food & beverage technology,
  • Food Science,
  • Public Policy - Social Services & Welfare,
  • Dietetics & nutrition,
  • Medical / Nutrition,
  • Politics / Current Events

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages100
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10357816M
    ISBN 100309059992
    ISBN 109780309059992
    OCLC/WorldCa38547760


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Vitamin C Fortification of Food Aid Commodities by Committee on International Nutrition--Vitamin C in Food Aid Commodities Download PDF EPUB FB2

This report contains the results of the USAID Vitamin C Pilot Program for use by USAID in consultation with the National Academy of Sciences to determine appropriate vitamin C fortification levels in food commodities used in U.S.

food aid programs. The Committee on International Nutrition—Vitamin C in Food Aid Commodities was constituted in response to this request.

The committee's overall task was to address the cost-effectiveness and advisability of scaling up Title II commodity vitamin C fortification to improve recipients' diet, nutrition, and health.

The United States contributes a variety of food commodities to global food aid through the Food for Peace Program authorized by Public Law (P.L.)Title II. These commodities include cereal grains (corn, wheat, rice, sorghum), pulses (peas, beans, lentils), and a variety of milled cereal and blended products (e.g., wheat flour, bulgur, cornmeal, soy flour, soy flour.

The commodities targeted for increased fortification with vitamin C were CSB and WSB—the only commodities exported in the Food for Peace program that are fortified with vitamin C.

Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Committee on International Nutrition--Vitamin C in Food Aid Commodities. Vitamin C fortification of food aid commodities. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Institute of Medicine (U.S.

Committee on International Nutrition--Vitamin C in Food Aid Commodities. Vitamin C fortification of food aid commodities. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: Institute of Medicine.

The highest vitamin C content is found in green and red peppers, broccoli, citrus fruits, strawberries, melons, tomatoes, raw cabbage, potatoes, and leafy greens such as spinach, turnip, and mustard greens.

Meat, fish, poultry, eggs, and. Suggested Citation:"References."Institute of Medicine. Vitamin C Fortification of Food Aid Commodities: Final gton, DC: The National Academies. Rowe JP, Ogden LV, Pike OA, Steele FM, Dunn ML. Effect of end-user preparation methods on vitamin content of fortified humanitarian food-aid commodities.

J Food Compost Anal. ;22(1)–7. CrossRef Google ScholarAuthor: Michael L. Dunn. ness of vitamin A fortification of some food items, such as sugar [15, 16] or MSG [17, 18], in improving vitamin A status and reducing xeropthhalmia, anemia, TABLE 1. Prevalence and numbers of cases of preschool-aged child and antenatal vitamin A deficiency and xerophthalmia by region Region Children.

Covering the full vitamin and mineral fortification of wheat and maize (corn) flours, this manual is intended to serve as a complementing document to the recent Food Fortification Guidelines by WHO and the Manual for Wheat Flour Fortification with Iron by USAID – MOST. More details on the scope of this manual are given at the end of this chapter.

The level of vitamin C fortification of blended food aid commodities should NOT be increased to 90 mg/ g, but should be maintained at the current level of 40 mg/ g. implementing or considering food fortification, and a source of information for scientists, technologists and the food industry.

The guidelines are written from a nutrition and public health perspective, to provide practical guidance on how food fortification should be implemented, monitored and evaluated. They are. Fortified and enriched foods were introduced in the s and s.

They were intended to help boost vitamin and mineral intake with foods that adults and Vitamin C Fortification of Food Aid Commodities book were already eating, like Author: Mandy Ferreira. Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on International Nutrition--Vitamin C in Food Aid Commodities.

Vitamin C Fortification of Food Aid Commodities: Final Report. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); Discussion of food fortification in the context of food aid programmes was based on the working paper 'Requirements for Effective Fortification in Food Aid Programmes' (CONFORT 6) which has been attached as Annex 6, for clarity.

Fortification of food aid for displaced persons and refugees was endorsed at the ICN in the World Plan of Action for. Vitamin C and Iron Absorption.

Vitamin C in the diet can enhance the absorption of iron from plant sources (non-heme iron) and improve the absorbability of fortification iron (nonchelated inorganic iron) added to diets that contain inhibitors of iron absorption (e.g., the phytate and polyphenols found in CSB and WSB).

In this context, vitamin C is oxidized by the presence of heavy metal ions (such as cupper, iron, and zinc), sulfites and other vitamins (such as B 1, B 2, and B 12) (Ball, ;Berry, This paper examines requirements for effective fortification in food aid programmes. The extent that food aid commodities are currently enriched/fortified by food donors is reviewed based on available information.

Criteria and limitations for food aid fortification are briefly discussed. Mongolia, for example, is working toward finalizing and implementing a food fortification law. Another example is from Sri Lanka where the Ministry of Health, Nutrition and Indigenous Medicine led a food fortification workshop in Participants agreed that mandatory wheat flour fortification was worth pursuing.

The level of vitamin C fortification of blended food aid commodities should not be increased but maintained at current levels of 40 mg/ gms. Other strategies to prevent or mitigate outbreaks of scurvy should however be implemented. On the 7th October South Africa made the fortification, with vitamin A, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pyridoxine, folic acid, iron and zinc) of certain types of maize meal (four of the now 18 different 2 maize products) and wheat flour (excluding 3 crushed wheat, pearled wheat, semolina, self-raising flour and flour with an ash content.

Food fortification can happen at the household level, the community level or, most commonly, at the industrial level: Mass fortification is when micronutrients are added to foods commonly consumed by the mass population – such as cereals and condiments.; Universal fortification is when micronutrients are added to food consumed by animals as well as people, such as with.

Food fortification is defined as the supplementation of one or more components, regardless of whether it is naturally found in the food, to improve the properties of newly designed functional food products (Swieca et al., ).

M.G. Venkatesh Mannar, Richard F. Hurrell, in Food Fortification in a Globalized World, the original food. Fortification is synonomous with enrichment. Restoration is where nutrients are added to a food to compensate for the loss of nutrients during processing.

Generally, food fortification is undertaken at the industrial level although food fortification can also take place at the household or community Size: 85KB. vitamin C.

Scurvy was also reported in selected communities in South Africa, e.g. among mine labourers and chronically malnourished urban populations (Grusin & Kincaid-Smith, ) whose diet consisted mainly of maize porridge, bread, small quantities of.

Studies have also shown that Vitamin C is a primary replenisher of Vitamin E, 1 'Vitamin C Fortification of Food Aid Commodities: Final Report.' in Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on International Nutrition--Vitamin C in Food Aid Commodities Washington (DC), National Academies Press (US), Fortification in food aid.

Countries receiving food aid should be made aware of existing mechanisms for requesting fortified food products according to local requirements. Evaluate the current and potential capacity of local and regional processing industries to fortify food aid commodities.

Vitamin C is known to be extremely labile in a neutral pH, liquid matrix. Cooking losses depend on the degree of heating, surface area exposed to water and oxygen, pH, presence of transition metals, and other factors that facilitate oxidation (Eitenmiller and Landen, ).It is not uncommon for vitamin C cooking losses to reach % (Gregory, ).

Vitamin A fortificants are almost exclusively retinyl palmitate (Fig. ); however, retinyl acetate can be found in some foods, e.g., yogurt in the matrices in which the vitamin is enclosed varies depending on the food being fortified.

It is widely accepted that staple food fortification is safe, effective, and affordable (DSM, ; Klemm et al., ). Food fortification or enrichment is the process of adding micronutrients (essential trace elements and vitamins) to can be carried out by food manufacturers, or by governments as a public health policy which aims to reduce the number of people with dietary deficiencies within a population.

The predominant diet within a region can lack particular nutrients due to the local. Vitamin C degradation during storage of fortified foods 60 to 97%. The highest retention of vitamin C was in solid foods (cocoa powder) and the lowest one in beverages (carbonated beverages).

The corre-sponding values are listed in Tables 1–3. Storage of fortified milks Since the milk is low in iron and vitamin C. • Prolonged cooking of fortified food leads to 90% loss of vitamin C • Fortified commodity is more expensive. 19 Future Challenges of Food Fortification 1.

Create community awareness about benefits of food fortification. Private Sector, Governments & International Agencies need to make commitments for investing in food fortification.

In-country Capacity for Food Fortification Relying on non-staple commodities as fortification vehicles has the result that refugees who exchange some of their commodities end up with less or insufficient amounts of the premix. Through building up local and regional capacity for fortification, emergency food aid might just serve as the.

Fortification with Vitamin D is a new requirement that introduces sources of vitamin D to US food aid products and brings it in line with World Food Program policies.

Vegetable oil is used an ingredient in cooking and is an essential component of. InHealth Canada proposed new food fortification regulations. This would continue the current fortification practices to prevent and correct nutritional problems such as requiring the addition of Vitamin D to milk or of folic acid to flour and to restore vitamins and minerals lost through processing.

Disease Nutrient Location Year(s) Deficiency (Group affected) Scurvy Vitamin C SudanKenya /95 Afghanistan Beri Beri Thiamin Mauritania Thailand a Vitamin A Sudan Pellagra Niacin Malawi Angola File Size: 1MB.

An outbreak of scurvy caused by vitamin C deficiency occurred among South Sudanese adolescent and young adult males living in a refugee camp who were receiving food rations and electronic cash to purchase food and add diversity and choice in their diets. However, rather than purchasing micronutrient-rich fresh foods they selected more calorie-dense cereal Cited by: 3.

In the form of retinol, vitamin A is more labile than its ester form; for this reason, vitamin A esters are usually used for food fortification, as illustrated by the list in table 1. Table 3 shows the stability of vitamin A in pasteurized, multivitamin-supplemented orange juice.

D.C. Woollard, H.E. Indyk, in Encyclopedia of Food Sciences and Nutrition (Second Edition), Use in Food Fortification. Increasing the vitamin A intake amongst populations at risk of retinol deficiency is a simple expediency and has been employed for several decades, both prophylactically and therapeutically.

Vitamin C is a powerful ingredient that packs a punch when it comes to skincare. We explore the many benefits it provides, and why a vitamin C serum is one of the most essential products in your skincare routine. 'Vitamin C Fortification of Food Aid Commodities: Final Report.' in Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on International.

Vitamin C is integral to maintaining a robust immune system as it assists in killing harmful pathogens and promotes the growth of white blood and research on the benefits of dragon fruit for humans is limited.

Vitamin C: Needs and Functions, Vitamin C Fortification of Food Aid Commodities: Final Report, National Academies Press. • Prolonged cooking of fortified food leads to 90% loss of vitamin C • Fortified commodity is more expensive.

Future Challenges of Food Fortification 1. Create community awareness about benefits of food fortification. 2. Private Sector, Governments & International Agencies need to make commitments for investing in food fortification.

3.